Join us for a Queer Newark Walking Tour!

QNWT flyerThe Queer Newark Oral History Project would like to welcome you to join us for our two brand new walking tours next month on July 6th (Military Park Newark Downtown Tour) and July 13th (Newark Gay Pride Encore Tour)!

The QNOHP tour will highlight the rich and illuminating experiences of the city’s LGBTQ and gender-nonconforming communities. Featuring both historical landmarks and contemporary sites, tour leaders will share stories about key events, significant happenings, and interesting personalities that showcase the resilience of an often-invisible population of Newarkers.

The group will leave from BURG in Military Park:
6pm to 7:30pm on July 6th
6:30pm to 8pm on July 13th

No registration necessary! Free and open to all! Be sure to wear comfortable shoes and bring a bottle of water!

Route Map:

QNWT map

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Queer Newark Oral History Project Spotlight May 13th at 6pm

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On May 13th at 6pm Queer Newark spotlights Kristyn Scorsone’s wonderful work “Invisible Pathways: Entrepreneurship by Queer Women of Color in Newark”! Join us and then stay for the Newark LGBTQ Community Center’s 4th Annual Dance-A-Thon Fundraiser with DJ Just Love!

To donate to the Dance-A-Thon and help support this much-needed sanctuary for the LGBTQ community in Newark, click HERE!

Listen to Professor Whit Strub’s interview with Tom Hayden about Carl Wittman and Newark!

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While sitting in a weird hotel room in Culver City in 2014, Professor Whit Strub interviewed Tom Hayden about Carl Wittman and Newark. Click HERE to listen to it!

“Tom Hayden (1939-2016) was a major figure in the New Left of the 1960s. A young white man from Michigan, he was physically attacked by racist white Southerners when he accompanied the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee on “freedom rides” in the South. He was also an early leader of Students for a Democratic Society (SDS), the flagshiporganization of the student left and anti-war movement. As the author of the famous 1962 SDS Port Huron Statement, he spoke for white middle-class activists, with the opening line, “We are people of this generation, bred in at least modest comfort, housed now in universities, looking uncomfortably to the world we inherit.”

Hayden was a straight man, but his importance to Queer Newark history stems from his fraught relationship with Carl Wittman, a gay man with whom Hayden co-authored the important 1963 SDS policy paper “An Interracial Movement of the Poor.”

Listen to our newest oral history interview with Burley Tuggle!

Check out our latest oral history interview with entrepreneur Burley Tuggle! She is a partner and one of the founding members of The Artisan Collective, a beautiful store at 25 Halsey St. Burley is also an outstanding sommelier. Every month on the first Wednesday she hosts an incredibly fun wine tasting at the store!

“There are all these incubators out here, but with the Artisan Collective, we created our own business model where we said, ‘You know what? We’re going to be five women. We are intergenerational. We have five different concepts, right, but we’re going to do all of this together under one roof.'” – Burley Tuggle

Click HERE to listen!

Opening Reception Thursday! “From Rebellion to Review Board: Fighting For Police Accountability in Newark”

15304081_1320335047997921_7055836983396757173_oCome join us for the opening reception of an important new exhibit, THURSDAY December 15, 2016 from 6-8pm: “From Rebellion to Review Board: Fighting For Police Accountability in Newark”

In 2016, Newark’s city council created its first civilian complaint review board with oversight over the police. This act was the culmination of more than fifty years of work by community members and organizations in the city who repeatedly demanded a review board in the face of police misconduct.

From Rebellion to Review Board tells the story of African American, Puerto Rican, and LGBTQ activists’ struggles against police misconduct and political disenfranchisement to claim power in Newark. Why did it take so long? How did differences within and between these communities help and hurt these efforts? What can we learn from this history to make a more just and equitable Newark today?

A companion exhibit, Acción Latina: Protesta y Transformación Socio-cultural en NuevaJersey, examines the forgotten Latinx riots that took place in four New Jersey towns in the 1960s and 1970s. This exhibit will be in Spanish.

Join us at the opening reception to see the exhibits, meet the graduate and undergraduate students who created them, and learn more about this important history.

RSVP here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/opening-reception-for-from-rebellion-to-review-board-fighting-for-police-accountability-in-newark-tickets-29722442626

Exhibit Opening:
December 15, 2016
6-8pm
Centennial Hall
Newark Public Library
5 Washington Street
Newark, NJ 07101-0630
(973) 733-7784

Exhibit on Display:
December 15, 2016 – February 3, 2017

Contact: Mary Rizzo, mary.rizzo@rutgers.edu or 973-353-1166

Support provided by:
American Studies Program at Rutgers University-Newark
Cultural Programming Grant, Rutgers University-Newark
The Newark Public Library

History Department Election-2016 Teach-In series: LGBTQ Rights

History Department Election-2016 Teach-In series: LGBTQ Rights

Tuesday, December 62-3pm, 245 Conklin Hall

The History Department is hosting a series of teach-ins in response to the shock, fear, and outpouring of hate produced by the election results last month. Our first event, last week, on Islamophobia was highly successful, and we are looking forward to our next event on 12/6 on LGBTQ rights2 pm, in Conklin 245 (there will be cookies). Open to the public, and all are welcomed!

Event page: https://www.facebook.com/events/1625587837744743/