University and City collaborate on opening of Community Writing Center – Building Community One Word at a Time

Ever wanted to write your own memoir?  Is there a poem inside of you waiting to come out?  Need help on your college application essay? Would you like to learn how to speak publicly and stop those knees from shaking? Draft business correspondence?

Rutgers University – Newark Chancellor Nancy Cantor and Mayor Ras J. Baraka are pleased to announce the opening of the Rutgers University-Newark Community Writing Center on Saturday, November 5, 2016 to support Newark residents in accomplishing these creative and professional goals and much more.

The mission of the Center is to support creative expression, information literacy, fluency in academic and professional discourses, and community engagement in civic affairs through the craft of writing. Founded on the belief that writing is socially transformative and affords possibilities for self and social reflection, growth, and mobility, the Center will provide Newark residents with access to professional tutors and workshop leaders.

This Center will offer writing support in creative expression, professional growth, and academic support. Tutoring will be offered on the Rutgers University-Newark campus, Room 126 Conklin Hall, 175 University Avenue from 10:00 am to 2:00 pm every first and third Saturday of the month, starting in November. In January 2017, the Center will begin to offer monthly writing workshops as well.

During tutoring hours, community members will work individually with tutors on projects of their choosing. The workshops will provide hands-on skills in writing for professional purposes, personal expression, academics, and civic engagement. Upcoming workshops include Writing through Trauma, Literacy through Photography, Writing and Citizenship, Letters to the Editor, Journaling and Creative Writing, and Writing A College Application Essay. 

ABOUT: Rutgers University–Newark Community Writing Center is funded by the Chancellor’s Office and is a collaborative project involving the Rutgers University-Newark Writing Program, the Clement A. Price Institute on Ethnicity, Culture, and the Modern Experience, the Portrait Studio, and the City of Newark.

CONTACT:  Marne Benson, Rutgers University-Newark Writing Center, 973-353-5849marneb@rutgers.educommunitywritingcenter.newark.rutgers.edu

For more information, contact: Marne Benson, 973-353-5849marneb@rutgers.edu.

Film Screening and Filmmaker Panel: Troublemakers

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Wednesday, Oct. 19th at 6pm come watch a screening of Newark’s greatest film, Troublemakers, about the mid-60s attempt to create an interracial movement of the poor.

Both filmmakers will be there for a panel that Queer Newark’s Professor Whit Strub will be moderating.

This event is FREE and OPEN to ALL!

Gay Rights Pioneer Tony Segura

Check out Slate.com for an important article by Queer Newark’s Whit Strub on gay rights pioneer Gonzalo “Tony” Segura

“In the very earliest years of America’s East Coast–based gay movement, long before Stonewall, a Cuban immigrant was arguably the central organizer for the struggle. His name was Tony Segura, and this National Hispanic Heritage Month, it’s time to give him his due.” 

To read the entire article, click HERE.

Happy National Coming Out Day!

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Happy National Coming Out Day! Many of the oral histories of Queer Newark discuss coming out. Check out this beautiful quote from our interview with Alicia Heath-Toby, Professional Life Coach and the current board president of the Newark LGBTQ Community Center Board of Directors.

“However, when I was with my first lover I brought her home and first initially my mother was very upset, and she was like, you cannot bring her here and you certainly can’t be, you know, with her in this house. And that was like alright, whatever cause I’m going back to school. But yet there was a time that I can remember so vividly walking down the street, going to a store, a department store that no longer exists, and I see my lover and my mother notices my response and she leans over and she said you can go and say hello if you like. 

So my mother was very — she was a very interesting person ‘cause she also honored that it meant something to me to love her and if I was happy, although she didn’t agree, she appreciated it and she felt like how can I deny her this thing called love whatever that is for her?”

You can listen to Alicia Heath-Toby’s entire interview with grad student, Naomi Extra on our website HERE!

Beyond the Hashtag: Why Your Vote Matters

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“Why should I vote?” “I am not inspired by the candidates.” “What is the value of my single vote anyway?”
These are important questions that young voters, currently the largest generation in our nation, have asked us in the past few months leading up to the November 8thelection.  And, given the significant challenges we face, they demand answers.
We invite you to join us for “Beyond the Hashtag: Why Your Vote Matters,” a dynamic conversation led by a panel of leading young voices on critical issues facing millennials.
October 4th at 6:30pm in the Paul Robeson Campus Center.